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(2015)#* - Griffith Observatory through a telephoto lens with Downtown Los Angeles in the background.  Photo by Wally Skalij, Los Angeles Times  

 

 

 

 

 
(2019)^.^ - Night view of the Los Angeles Downtown skyline as seen from Mt. Lee with the Griffith Park Observatory in the foreground.  

 

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Immanuel Presbyterian Church

 
(ca. 1900)* – View looking southeast toward the intersection of Figueroa and 10th streets showing the Immanuel Presbyterian Church on the SE corner. The church has a tall square tower with a peaked roof on the corner. An arched stained-glass window is above the three doors of the main entry.  

 

Historical Notes

Los Angeles architect James H. Bradbeer drew up plans for the Immanuel Presbyterian Church in 1890. The church was listed in the 1892 Los Angeles City Directory with Reverend W.J. Chichester as its pastor. His residence was on the west side of Burlington Avenue near Orange Street.

In 1897, Hugh Kelso Walker took over as the first Pastor of the first Immanuel Presbyterian Churc. His first sermon was delivered in early 12/1897.^

 

 

 

 
(ca. 1905)^^* - A man in a 3-piece suit wearing a hat pauses on the sidewalk in front of a palm tree (Dracenas palm tree) and looks up at it. Immanuel Presbyterian Church can be seen in the background on what is today the SE corner of Figueroa Street and Olympic Boulevard.  The building on the left is the Friday Morning Club Building (constructed in 1900).  

 

 

 

 

 
(ca. 1915)* – Close-up view of Immanuel Presbyterian Church, located on the southwest corner of Figueroa Street and *10th Street (now Olympic Boulevard).  

 

Historical Notes

In 1932, the entire length of the 10th Street, from East L.A. to Santa Monica, was renamed Olympic Boulevard for the 10th Summer Olympics being held in Los Angeles that year.

 

 

 

 
(ca. 1928)* – View of the Immanuel Presbyterian Church taken approximately a year before it was demolished, with the neighboring Petroleum Securities Building, at 714 Olympic Boulevard, seen in the background.  

 

Historical Notes

Immanuel Presbyterian Church relocated to a Gothic Revival style church on Wilshire Boulevard and Berendo Street in 1928. Click HERE to see more on the new church.

 

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(ca. 2018)*# – Aerial view of the Aon Center Building, #3 Tallest in Los Angeles.  Photo Credit: Daniel Safarik  

 

Historical Notes

Aon Center Building Ranking as of 2018:

◆ Global Ranking             #310 Tallest in the World 

◆ Regional Ranking        #49 Tallest in North America 

◆ National Ranking         #44 Tallest in United States 

◆ City Ranking                  #3 Tallest in Los Angeles

 

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Figueroa and 10th (later Olympic Blvd)

 
(1925)^*# – View showing the Hotel Figueroa as seen from a gas station on the SE corner of Figueroa St. and 10th Street (later *Olympic Blvd).  Signs on the side of the building read:  ‘Hotel Figueroa - Absolutely Fire Proof’ and ‘YWCA – Plunge and Gymnasium’. Note the ornate 5-lamp streetlights. Click HERE for contemporary view.  

 

Historical Notes

*Olympic Boulevard was originally named 10th Street. In 1932, the entire length of the street, from East L.A. to Santa Monica, was renamed Olympic Boulevard for the Summer Olympics being held in Los Angeles that year.

 

 

 
(1925)^*# – View looking southwest showing the newly constructed Figueroa Hotel located at 941 So. Figueroa Street. The intersection of Figueroa and 10th streets is seen on the left.  

 

Historical Notes

Built in 1925, Hotel Figueroa was the first hotel to be completely financed, owned and operated by women in the United States. The YWCA (Young Women’s Christian Association) hired architecture firm Stanton, Reed & Hibbard to design and build the hotel. The Spanish Colonial style of the hotel pays tribute to the city’s Spanish and Mexican heritage. Defining features include the elaborate coffered ceiling, sculpture columns, wrought iron finishes, and ornate floor tiles.^

 

 

 
(1931)^.^ – View looking north on Figueroa Street showing several women standing in front of Hotel Figueroa. Note the 5-globe streetlight in front of the hotel. Click HERE to see more.  

 

Historical Notes

Originally the hotel only hosted travelling business women and their children. However, as effects of the Great Depression were becoming more severe, Hotel Figueroa started to accommodate men.^

 

 

 
(1926)* - View looking southeast across Figueroa Street showing the Friday Morning Club Building and Figueroa Playhouse.  The Playhouse marquee reads:  “Coming Pauline Frederick”.  The church seen in the distance is the Immanuel Presbyterian Church, located on the southeast corner of what is now Figueroa Street and Olympic Boulevard.  

 

 

 

 
(ca. 1928)^ - View looking NE from in front of the Hotel Figueroa toward the Figueroa Playhouse located in the Friday Morning Club Building, 940 S. Figueroa. In the foreground a boy on a bicycle is hitching onto a truck.  

 

 

 

 
(ca. 1928)^ - View showing a crowd of people in front of the Figueroa Playhouse. The marquee at upper-left reads PLAYHOUSE: "Anne Nichols Abie's Irish Rose."  

 

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(ca. 1941)^.^ – View looking north on Figueroa Street towards 9th Street showing the Friday Morning Club building on the right.  The sign on the theatre marquee now reads “Times”.  Movie now playing is “Back in the Saddle” starring Gene Autry  

 

Historical Notes

In 1940, the auditorium was renamed the Times Theater, which tried to fill its calendar with stage shows, lectures and an occasional movie screening. However, the theater began losing its luster. ^

 

 

 
(1970s) - View showing the Friday Morning Club with new marquee reading "Playhouse".  

 

Historical Notes

After reverting the theater back to its original name, The Playhouse, the building was granted landmark status on August 9, 1978. 

 

 

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(2010)^.^ – View of 12-story, triple towers Hotel Figueroa and its south face wall murals.  

 

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Hotel Figueroa Historical Timeline:

◆ August 14, 1926 opened as Hotel Figueroa, for women only

◆ February 1928, Hotel Figueroa opened floors for men

◆ October 1930, Hotel Figueroa opened to all sexes

◆ 1931-1958 Hotel Figueroa is a hub of creative community, political organizations and social clubs in DTLA

◆ 1959-1976 Hotel Figueroa (and DTLA) operates as a semi-permanent residential hotel as the once dynamic downtown neighborhood experiences westward migration of offices and residents

◆ February 1976, Uno Thimansson takes over Hotel Figueroa as General Manager, begins transforming it into a “Moroccan retreat.”

◆ July 2014 Hotel Figueroa is purchased by Green Oak Real Estate and Urban Lifestyle Hotels, begins 3 year restoration to original Spanish Colonial Revival style

◆ February 2018: Reopens to the public^

 

 

 

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Aon Center Building Ranking as of 2018:

◆ Global Ranking             #310 Tallest in the World 

◆ Regional Ranking        #49 Tallest in North America 

◆ National Ranking         #44 Tallest in United States 

◆ National Ranking         #44 Tallest in United States 

 

 

 

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(2010s)^^ - Above it all! US Bank glass crown that shines like a beacon at night.  

 

Historical Notes

On February 28, 2004, two 75 ft “U.S. Bank” logo signs were installed on the crown, amid controversy for their effect on the aesthetic appearance of the building, much like the previous First Interstate Bank logos were placed on the crown between 1990 and 1998. First Interstate Bank's “I” logo on the crown was in the 1993 Guinness Book of World Records for highest-placed logo.

The tower's 69th floor and 70th floor have been renovated into a multi-layer observation deck, including outdoor space on 69th floor. And 71st floor serves as a 360 degree panoramic restaurant.*

The large glass crown at its top is illuminated at night, in the following colors:
◆ White (every day)
◆ Red and green during the Christmas holiday season
◆ Pink and red for Valentine's Day
◆ Red and gold for Chinese New Year
◆ Red, white, and blue for Independence Day and Veterans Day
◆ Orange for Halloween
◆ Red, green, gold, blue, and purple leading up to the 2015 Special Olympics World Summer Games
◆ Blue and white when the Los Angeles Dodgers are playing in the postseason
◆ Purple and gold when the Los Angeles Lakers are playing in the NBA Finals
◆ Blue and gold for the return of the Los Angeles Rams
◆ Black and white when the Los Angeles Kings are playing in the Stanley Cup Final
◆ Purple for Alzheimer's Association and World Prematurity Day
◆ Red for Blood Cancer Awareness Month
◆ Pink for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

 

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Recent Museum Additions

We invite you to visit our newest Virtual Museum Sections:

 

 

A new SEARCH INDEX has beed added to help you navigate through the thousands of images included our collection. Try it out for a test run.

 

Click HERE for Search Index

 

 

 

Search Index

 
 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

 

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

 

 

A new SEARCH INDEX has beed added to help in navigating through the thousands of images included our collection. Try it out for a test run.

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Search Index

 
 

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Historical Notes

In 1903 this interesting Richardsonian Romanesque building became the Orpheum - the second home of Orpheum Circuit vaudeville in Los Angeles. Previously they'd been at the Grand Opera House. *##

There were four Orpheum theatres in downtown Los Angeles:

◆ 110 S. Main St. -- Grand Opera House was the home of Orpheum vaudeville from 1894 to 1903.

◆ 227 S. Spring St. -- The Los Angeles Theatre, later called The Lyceum, was known as the Orpheum from 1903 to 1911.

◆ 630 S. Broadway -- Now the Palace Theatre -- this was the Orpheum between 1911 and 1926.

◆ 842 S. Broadway - Orpheum Theatre from 1926 to Today

 

Hotel Figueroa Historical Timeline:

◆ August 14, 1926 opened as Hotel Figueroa, for women only

◆ February 1928, Hotel Figueroa opened floors for men

◆ October 1930, Hotel Figueroa opened to all sexes

◆ 1931-1958 Hotel Figueroa is a hub of creative community, political organizations and social clubs in DTLA

◆ 1959-1976 Hotel Figueroa (and DTLA) operates as a semi-permanent residential hotel as the once dynamic downtown neighborhood experiences westward migration of offices and residents

◆ February 1976, Uno Thimansson takes over Hotel Figueroa as General Manager, begins transforming it into a “Moroccan retreat.”

◆ July 2014 Hotel Figueroa is purchased by Green Oak Real Estate and Urban Lifestyle Hotels, begins 3 year restoration to original Spanish Colonial Revival style

◆ February 2018: Reopens to the public

 

Hotel Figueroa Historical Timeline:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 1976, Uno Thimansson takes over Hotel Figueroa as General Manager, begins transforming it into a “Moroccan retreat.”

July 2014 Hotel Figueroa is purchased by Green Oak Real Estate and Urban Lifestyle Hotels, begins 3 year restoration to original Spanish Colonial Revival style

February 2018: Reopens to the public

 

More Historical Early Views

 

 

Newest Additions

 

 

Early LA Buildings and City Views

 

 

History of Water and Electricity in Los Angeles

 

 

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History of Water and Electricity in Los Angeles

 

 

 

More Historical Early Views

 

 

Newest Additions

 

 

Early LA Buildings and City Views

 

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Los Angeles Historical Photos

 

Early City Views (1800s)

Historical Bldgs (1800s)

Early Hollywood (1850 - 1920)

Early San Fernando Mission

Early Los Angeles Plaza

Early Amusement Parks

Baseball in Early Los Angeles

Aviation in Early Los Angeles

Early San Pedro and Wilmington

Early City Views (1900 - 1925)

Historical Bldgs (1900 - 1925)

Early Views of Hollywood (1920 +)

Early Views of the San Fernando Valley

California Historical Landmarks in LA

Historical Timeline of Los Angeles

Los Angeles River - The Unpredictable

Early Views of Mt. Lowe Railway

Early Views of Santa Catalina Island

Early City Views (1925 +)

Historical Bldgs (1925 +)

Early Views of Hollywood Bowl

Early Views of Pasadena

Early Views of Santa Monica

Early Views of UCLA / Westwood

Early Views of USC

Early Views of Historic Main Street

Early Los Angeles Streetlights

 
 

Newest Additions

 

Early Views of Beverly Hills

Early Views of West Hollywood

Early Views of LA Gas Stations

Early LA Programmatic-Style Buildings

Early Boylston Street Yard

Early Views of Cahuenga Pass

 

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For Historical Early Views of Los Angeles click one of the following:

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*++Getty Research Institute

 

 

 

 

Santa Maria NOT San Fernando

 
(1918)^^ - Aerial view of the City of San Fernando, 1918. In the foreground is a residential neighborhood composed of small houses on tree-lined streets. At the center of the image is a commercial area composed of mostly two-story square buildings that appear to be shops. One building on the right side of this area has an awning running the length of its facade. In the background are open agricultural fields occasionally bordered by lines of trees.  

 

Historical Notes

The city's founding in 1874 was spurred by a land boom in Southern California and the Southern Pacific Railroad's building of a rail line between Bakersfield and Los Angeles through Fremont Pass. Soon populated with an influx of settlers, San Fernando became known as the railroad's "gateway to the north," and with its Mediterranean climate and deep wells that provided water for irrigation, the community cultivated an abundance of vegetables and fruits, especially citrus and olives. That independent water supply allowed San Fernando to remain autonomous and incorporate in 1911, while most of the valley's other communities felt compelled to annex to Los Angeles in 1915 to avail themselves of the waters of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, which started flowing in 1913.*#^*

 

 

 

St. Francis Dam Diaster Video:

Click HERE to see the riveting events that followed the dam's failure in a short (4 min.) Animated Video**
- Please Turn Up Volume - Video will begin within 10 seconds -

 

**Ventura County Star: http://web.vcstar.com/video/08/damflyover0308/damflyover0308.html; St. Francis Dam Flood Path

 

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